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Happy Birthday, Edward Stratemeyer

Today is the 158th anniversary of Edward Stratemeyer’s birth on October 4, 1862. Over his lifetime his birthday was remembered by family and fans. Like many of his readers, his own birthdays were celebrated with the gift of books. Upon learning about the death of Horatio Alger, Jr., Edward wrote to Alger’s sister, Olive Augusta […]

The Ted Scott series takes off

Dust jacket for the first Ted Scott volume, Over the Ocean to Paris (1927).

The first volume of the Ted Scott series was an obvious retelling of the first solo Transatlantic flight by Charles A. Lindbergh in May 1927.  From time to time a reference is made to how quickly the story was rushed into print.  An examination of the dates is interesting. Charles Lindbergh departed from Roosevelt Field, Long Island, […]

Hawaiian Volcano

George C. Stratemeyer lived in Hawaii for the latter half of his life.

The present-day eruption of Kilauea in Hawaii calls to mind the Stratemeyer family connections with Hawaii and its volcanoes.

On This Date — Sept. 16

Sept 16, 1919 letter from a young fan

On this date, September 16, in 1919 Edward Stratemeyer responded to a young fan and revealed some things about how he became a writer. The Rover Boys Second Series is mentioned.

Marginalia — Ed Zuckerman

Ed Zuckerman noticed that the Hardy Boys published in 1976 were not the same as the ones he grew up with. Investigating this, he learned of the revised texts and Leslie McFarlane. He corresponded with the first ghostwriter of the series and got this copy of The Secret of the Caves signed after he had marked passages to use in an article he wrote for Rolling Stone magazine.

The Gift

Regifting or exchanging a gift is a common activity after the holiday season but it is not especially new. Here is a rare instance when Edward Stratemeyer felt obliged to return a book he received from a publisher.

Nancy Drew 50th Anniversary Gala

Harriet Stratemeyer Adams arrives in the back of a blue roadster.

As sales declined in the 1970s, Harriet Stratemeyer Adams considered whether to accept an overture from Simon & Schuster to publish new books in the series. First Grosset & Dunlap failed to do anything for the Bobbsey Twins 75th anniversary. Then they admitted they had no plans for Nancy Drew’s 50th in 1980. Simon & Schuster stepped in and hosted a gala event.