Dedicated to the legacy of Edward Stratemeyer, author & founder of the Stratemeyer Syndicate

Edward Stratemeyer (1862-1930)

stratemeyer-olderAlthough primarily known for creating popular series like Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys, through his Stratemeyer Syndicate, Edward Stratemeyer was a popular author in his own right.  From 1894 to 1926 there were 168 of his stories published as books under his own name and some personal pseudonyms.  He also wrote also wrote dozens of short stories, dime novels, and serials for story papers and magazines.

Find out more about Edward Stratemeyer with this introductory biography

Find out more about the Stratemeyer Syndicate

Other Articles About Edward Stratemeyer:

Blog Posts About Edward Stratemeyer:

The Gift

Choosing the right gift for someone is always a challenge.  It is even more difficult when it is a gift for a business contact if you don’t know them very well. Of course sometimes the recipient returns the gift.  However, it is not very often that the recipient returns it to the presenter with a […]

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Happy Birthday, Harriet Stratemeyer Adams

This post is written on Harriet Stratemeyer Adam’s 124th birthday (eldest daughter of author Edward Stratemeyer). Edward Stratemeyer founded the Stratemeyer Syndicate in 1905. Although he had the idea earlier and wrote about the idea, the first book assignments produced through the Syndicate process were ordered in 1905 and published in 1906. He ran the […]

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Association Copy — George Waldo Browne

An association copy is a book whose interest is enhanced by annotations by a creator of the work or one that has been passed from one person to another where the people have a strong connection with the work or the creator’s career overall.  ABC for Book Collectors by John Carter includes this definition and examples: […]

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1894 Ghost story by Edward Stratemeyer

Among the least-known form of Edward Stratemeyer’s writings are his short stories for newspapers, especially the Newark Sunday Call.  This weekly from his home town ran a group of stories by Stratemeyer that were timed and themed to the holidays of the year.  With only a local audience in mind, locations known to Newark-area readers were included. […]

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Edward Stratemeyer’s New York City

Edward Stratemeyer lived for most of his professional life in Newark, New Jersey.  Most of his publishers had offices in nearby New York City.  As Horatio Alger Jr. had before him, many of Edward’s stories featured detailed descriptions of the metropolis.  Unlike the made-up small towns used in the books, there was a great probability […]

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Location — 31 Broad Street, Elizabeth, NJ

One of the persistent myths about Edward Stratemeyer is that he wrote his first long professional story, “Victor Horton’s Idea,” while clerking in a relative’s shop in Elizabeth, New Jersey.  He is said to have found some idle time and took wrapping paper from a roll and wrote his story in pencil to be sent […]

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Series Book Autographs

When collecting modern first printings, the typical desire is to obtain a first printing of a book in fine condition that is signed by the author.  Sometimes these copies are the only ones that will sell at all.  With juvenile series books, this is usually not possible because there were relatively few occasions to meet […]

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Bobbsey Twins format page

The Bobbsey Twins was one of the longest-running series produced by the Stratemeyer Syndicate.  The first volume was personally written by Edward Stratemeyer and was published in 1904. It was not a big seller.  Undeterred, two additional titles were added in 1907, the product of a ghostwriter, Lilian C. Garis, working from Stratemeyer’s outlines.  These also did […]

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Ghostwriting in the Mega-Books era

A recent article in The Atlantic gives some interesting perspectives on the role of ghostwriting the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew in the era immediately after the Stratemeyer Syndicate was sold to Simon & Schuster in 1984.   When the Stratemeyer Syndicate was a separate entity, they supplied the outlines to ghostwriters, edited the stories, and submitted […]

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Early Stratemeyer Mysteries

If Edward Stratemeyer is known today, it is as the founder of the Stratemeyer Syndicate and the creator of their longest-lasting and most famous series, the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew.  For many readers and collectors, mystery stories similar to these are their primary interest.  The Syndicate had many types of series, including outdoor, school, sports, career, […]

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