Dedicated to the legacy of Edward Stratemeyer, author & founder of the Stratemeyer Syndicate

404 Error

Sorry, you appear to have gotten lost. We rewrote our site awhile back and some links might have changed.

Contact us if you can’t find what you were looking for on our site!

Please select from our menu above (or use the search tool at the far right of the menu) or see below for some possible pages you might have been looking for when you clicked here.

I’m looking for information on:

Edward Stratemeyer, author and founder of the Syndicate

The Stratemeyer Syndicate

Recent Blog Posts:

A preliminary sketch for Tom Swift and His Rocket Ship that was not selected for final illustration by George Barr.

Artwork—George Barr illustrates Tom Swift

After 33 successful hardcover titles were published in the Tom Swift Jr. series by Grosset & Dunlap between 1954 and 1971, there were two paperback editions offered.  The first group of four from 1974 were large digest-size paperbacks.  New cover art was made but the original printing plates were used, complete with the Graham Kaye illustrations […]

0 comments
31 Broad Street at the corner of Washington was the location of Maurice Stratemeyer's music shop shown in this 1889 Sanborn Fire Insurance map.

Location—31 Broad Street, Elizabeth, NJ

One of the persistent myths about Edward Stratemeyer is that he wrote his first long professional story, “Victor Horton’s Idea,” while clerking in a relative’s shop in Elizabeth, New Jersey.  He is said to have found some idle time and took wrapping paper from a roll and wrote his story in pencil to be sent […]

0 comments
"Victor Appleton II" signature in a presentation to a Syndicate consultant in 1966.

Series Book Autographs

When collecting modern first printings, the typical desire is to obtain a first printing of a book in fine condition that is signed by the author.  Sometimes these copies are the only ones that will sell at all.  With juvenile series books, this is usually not possible because there were relatively few occasions to meet […]

0 comments
BobbseyFormats

Bobbsey Twins format page

The Bobbsey Twins was one of the longest-running series produced by the Stratemeyer Syndicate.  The first volume was personally written by Edward Stratemeyer and was published in 1904. It was not a big seller.  Undeterred, two additional titles were added in 1907, the product of a ghostwriter, Lilian C. Garis, working from Stratemeyer’s outlines.  These also did […]

0 comments
A pair of Tom Swift brand shoes.

Artifact—Tom Swift Shoes

Tom Swift was among the Syndicate’s most successful creations.  The first series was forty volumes published between 1910 and 1941 and featured a young inventor of Shopton, New York, who made airships and other gadgets and these were instrumentals in adventures around the world. The inventive genius ran in the family.  Tom inherited it from his […]

0 comments
Example of a copper-clad electrotype printing plate used for The Clue of the Rusty Key (©1942) in the Dana Girls series.  The plate has a copper printing surface and a heavy backing metal (overall 1 lb.).

Artifact—Dana Girls electrotype printing plate

When series books were published, it was expected that thousands of copies would be printed and sold.  The lead-based type metal (actually lead, tin and antimony) was too soft and heavy for a page’s worth of type.  The electrotype printing plate was one of two main methods used to make plates for books (and other […]

0 comments
1905-14Bis_Summer_Test

Hybrid Airship Inspirations: Santos-Dumont

As written previously, this novel combination aircraft was not without a real-life precedent. Most of the inventions in the Tom Swift series are enhancements of real inventions. Although the design was not ultimately successful, the combined aeroplane-dirigibile balloon was an area of interest for several inventors. It is difficult to know precisely which publications were […]

0 comments
Examples of 1980s and 1990s Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books produced by the Syndicate (left) and afterward.

Ghostwriting in the Mega-Books era

A recent article in The Atlantic gives some interesting perspectives on the role of ghostwriting the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew in the era immediately after the Stratemeyer Syndicate was sold to Simon & Schuster in 1984.   When the Stratemeyer Syndicate was a separate entity, they supplied the outlines to ghostwriters, edited the stories, and submitted […]

0 comments
1905-14Bis_Summer_Test

Tom Swift’s Combined Aeroplane-Dirigible Balloons

To the modern reader used to visualizing the frail pioneering aircraft of the Wright brothers, Glenn Curtiss, and others, the Red Cloud from the Tom Swift series seems utterly fantastic — the stuff of science fiction. However, as was often the case, the descriptions were not pure fantasy but rather extensions of concepts and inventions described in […]

0 comments
Two "Chester K. Steele" mysteries by Howard R. Garis, The Golf Course Mystery (1919) and The Diamond Cross Mystery (1918).

Early Stratemeyer Mysteries

If Edward Stratemeyer is known today, it is as the founder of the Stratemeyer Syndicate and the creator of their longest-lasting and most famous series, the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew.  For many readers and collectors, mystery stories similar to these are their primary interest.  The Syndicate had many types of series, including outdoor, school, sports, career, […]

0 comments

Subscribe to our Blog with RSS

follow us with RSS follow us in feedly

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.